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A Pentagon investigation uncovered at least five cases of Quran mishandling by U. personnel at the base, but insisted that none of these were acts of desecration.

The Pentagon's report also accused a prisoner of damaging a copy of the Quran by putting it in a toilet.

We obviously blame ourselves for not understanding the potential ramifications.

On May 10 and continuing the following week, many violent anti-American protests took place, and in some areas these turned into deadly riots.

In 2007, the American Civil Liberties Union, suing under the Freedom of Information Act, secured the release of a 2002 FBI report containing a detainee's accusation of ill-treatment, including throwing a Quran into a toilet. interrogations at prisons in Afghanistan and Iraq as well as Guantánamo Bay had been made by a number of sources going back to 2002. government source acknowledging an inquiry into the event.

This specific accusation had been made on several occasions by other Guantanamo detainees since 2002; Newsweek's initial account of a government report confirming it sparked protests throughout the Islamic world and riots in Afghanistan, where pre-planned demonstrations turned deadly. The Newsweek affair turned the spotlight on earlier media reports of such incidents. On April 30, 2005 Newsweek magazine published an article claiming that an unnamed United States official had seen a government report supporting a "previously unreported" charge. personnel may have deliberately defaced the Quran provoked massive anti-U. demonstrations throughout the Islamic world, with at least 17 deaths during riots in Afghanistan. The Isikoff article was later retracted by Newsweek, which nonetheless defended both its reporter and the story, stating "neither we nor the Pentagon had any idea it would lead to deadly riots." The case turned the spotlight on other reports of desecration of the Quran at Guantánamo. On May 6, a popular member of the Pakistani parliament, Imran Khan, held a press conference.

Our image abroad has been damaged." However, in a press release issued by the United States Department of State on May 12, General Richard B.

The Newsweek report cited an anonymous source, said to be a senior government official, who claimed to have seen a confidential investigative report documenting the alleged incident — in which interrogators, "in an attempt to rattle suspects, reportedly flushed a Quran down a toilet." However, on May 16, Newsweek retracted the statement that the abuse had been uncovered by an "internal military investigation." after the source of the story was later unable to confirm where he had seen the information.

The riots began on May 10th; in Afghanistan, seventeen people died and more than a hundred were injured.' The Newsweek article, part of which was subsequently retracted, stated that allegations that United States personnel at the Guantanamo Bay detention camp had deliberately damaged a copy of the book by flushing it in a toilet in order to torment the prison's Muslim captives had been confirmed by government sources.

The Newsweek article stated that an official had seen a preliminary copy of an unreleased U. government report confirming the deliberate damage. Later on, the magazine retracted this when the (still) unnamed official changed his story.

The guards in the detention facility do not treat him well. About five months ago, the guards beat the detainees. The guards dance around when the detainees are trying to pray.

The guards still do these things." The ACLU Executive Director Anthony Romero said, in a news release, that "The United States government continues to turn a blind eye to mounting evidence of widespread abuse of detainees held in its custody." The FBI declared that it could not investigate the matter, as it was up to the Defense Department to do so.

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